How to Prevent Cats from Clawing Furniture

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As a cat owner, it can be incredibly frustrating to come home to a torn couch, ripped carpet, or destroyed desk chair. I’ve been there plenty of times, and I’ve tried a variety of tactics, some good, some bad. To get your furry friend to break their havoc-creating habit, you’ve got to take action. The following tips will help you reclaim your home or pet-friendly apartment from your meowing menace.

  1. Never Declaw your Cat

Let’s start with what not to do. No matter how tempting it is and no matter what disinformation you read, claws are necessary for your kitten. Scratching is a vital emotional and social display for any cat, and removing their claws is an amputation that often results in other aggressive behaviors.

  1. Provide Cat Furniture

Tired of your kitty clawing your furniture? Provide them with cat furniture. I have a cat tree in the dining room of my apartment that my cats love to climb and scratch. They stretch their legs as they make their way from section to section. I also have a large scratching post beside the couch. Location is important; you should provide alternatives to scratching near any problem area like a couch or chair. You should try to provide at least one scratching post per cat throughout your luxury apartment home.

  1. Use Double-Sided Tape

Double-sided tape should only need to be used temporarily on problem areas. For instance, if your cat is constantly clawing the arm of your couch, place double-sided tape or even tin foil over it to avert the behavior away. Once the cats associate the couch with the problematic tape, they should stop scratching it all together.

  1. Trim Your Cat’s Nails

If you don’t trim your cat’s nails, the rest of the tips will be moot points. Few cats actually enjoy having their nails trimmed, but if you start them out as kittens, they’ll accept it as part of their routine. I always try to catch my cats during a nap, that way they’re as docile as possible.

When you cut your cat’s nails, you need to be aware of its different sections. You only need to cut the clear end of the nail—do not cut the pink part, as it will result in pain and bleeding for your cat, and suffice to say, they’ll never enjoy trimming time again. Also, make sure that your nail trimmers are sharp; otherwise, you can splinter or crush your kitty’s nails.

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About Kristin

Master reviewer of all types of products. Love XL Fountain Sodas!! Cheer Mom extraordinaire. Socialite to all things small town and founder of ItsFreeAtlast.com. Come socialize and connect with me.

Comments

  1. http://belinda%20bell says

    These are great ideas. I am getting a kitty and these will be helpful.

  2. http://Dana%20Rodriguez says

    These are great tips. I am not a fan of declawing either. I considered it but she has been good so far with a scratching post and tons of toys.

  3. http://Donna%20L%20Holder says

    great information. thank you

  4. http://Charlene%20Carr says

    I know how frustrating it is to get cats to stop clawing the furniture. It’s not easy to get them to stop but I guess the double-sided tape may work. I would try that. It seems easy enough to try.

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